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Tools we want but don't need

bryanchurch06

Active member
Joined
Nov 4, 2022
Messages
230
When I worked construction I always had a couple tool boxes, 1 was for the tools I used every day the other stayed in the truck and it was full of tools I thought I would use but after awhile just stopped carrying with me, I swear when I bought them I needed them. Now that I am doing 100 percent of the work on my 3 bikes I find myself going down the same rabbit hole. So in the spirit of go ahead and laugh at me here is my latest. I know I don't need it but I want it, BTW my wife says I'm the same way with kitchen gadgets but that's a different forum
 

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dmonkey

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Joined
Jul 4, 2021
Messages
947
Having the right tool for the job makes a big difference! I use that Motion Pro slack setter and a Grunge Brush often. Have even taken them touring.

Adam Savage (from Mythbusters) has a YouTube channel where he talks a lot about workshop considerations he's made such as when to buy a specialty tool vs use what's on hand, as well as tool organization and having duplicate tools (a hammer in every room). He's made me feel a lot better about having duplicates of some things. If you don't know where something is or it's not accessible, it doesn't do you much good.
 

m in sc

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Joined
Feb 2, 2021
Messages
1,326
Location
Rockhill, SC
one of the weirder ones I have, and I have a LOT of specialty tools, is a motorcycle specific rear shock spring tool. however, one i dont have but would like (have borrowed one in the past a lot) is a tubing bender, one that can do up to 1.5" tubing. but its hard to justify.
 

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oldskool

Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2022
Messages
60
one of the weirder ones I have, and I have a LOT of specialty tools, is a motorcycle specific rear shock spring tool. however, one i dont have but would like (have borrowed one in the past a lot) is a tubing bender, one that can do up to 1.5" tubing. but its hard to justify.
As many bikes as you have, had and will have I think it is well justified.
 

Cpd419

Active member
Joined
Jul 16, 2022
Messages
236
Don’t get me started. I’m the worlds worst. I was a sears junkie now it’s harbor freight. The icon parrot nose pliers are the tits. Latest acquirement.
 

bryanchurch06

Active member
Joined
Nov 4, 2022
Messages
230
Don’t get me started. I’m the worlds worst. I was a sears junkie now it’s harbor freight. The icon parrot nose pliers are the tits. Latest acquirement.
Yea I want the icon hex tools set, just always miss the coupon
 

dmonkey

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Joined
Jul 4, 2021
Messages
947
I used to work at Sears Holdings Corp when "eating your own dog food" was heavily encouraged and my team could get just about anything at cost. The silliest tools I ended up with are probably dog bone wrenches. Awkward 8-in-1 combo wrenches that have been around since at least the 20s, and people have probably been laughing at them since then. I tried using my SAE ones a few times on a jalopy roadtrip to hold one side of same-sized fasteners while turning the other with a proper socket or combination wrench. Ended up falling back to a slip-joint pliers wrench instead, one that wasn't as nice as the Icon Parrot Nose one. There was rarely room for the dog bone wrench to fit, and the swivel made it difficult to keep from slipping off the head of any fastener. One of those combo tools that looks useful when demonstrated in an infomercial, but not in the real world :LOL:
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bryanchurch06

Active member
Joined
Nov 4, 2022
Messages
230
I used to work at Sears Holdings Corp when "eating your own dog food" was heavily encouraged and my team could get just about anything at cost. The silliest tools I ended up with are probably dog bone wrenches. Awkward 8-in-1 combo wrenches that have been around since at least the 20s, and people have probably been laughing at them since then. I tried using my SAE ones a few times on a jalopy roadtrip to hold one side of same-sized fasteners while turning the other with a proper socket or combination wrench. Ended up falling back to a slip-joint pliers wrench instead, one that wasn't as nice as the Icon Parrot Nose one. There was rarely room for the dog bone wrench to fit, and the swivel made it difficult to keep from slipping off the head of any fastener. One of those combo tools that looks useful when demonstrated in an infomercial, but not in the real world :LOL:
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It's like a multi tool, sure it's got pliers, screwdriver, knife blade and various other tools and in an emergency you can make do but I'd never want to use them if I had a real tool, IMHO any tool that does several different things don't do any of them well.
 

SneakyDingo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2021
Messages
830
When I worked construction I always had a couple tool boxes, 1 was for the tools I used every day the other stayed in the truck and it was full of tools I thought I would use but after awhile just stopped carrying with me, I swear when I bought them I needed them. Now that I am doing 100 percent of the work on my 3 bikes I find myself going down the same rabbit hole. So in the spirit of go ahead and laugh at me here is my latest. I know I don't need it but I want it, BTW my wife says I'm the same way with kitchen gadgets but that's a different forum

Multiple toolboxes beats one big, heavy toolbox any day! I have a milk crate sitting in my closet with a toolbag, a drill kit, and several silicone trays for regular stuff inside the house, followed by 2 other toolkits outside that house my motorcycle tools and less commonly used tools.

I started a tradition of using my bonus to buy a "trinket" thing that I thought I might like. I've been constantly surprised at how many have since made it into my regular rotation and I would be sad if I had to do things without it (most recently a label printer, and a set of measuring spoons). I think if you use it a lot and like it, it's not a silly purchase.

As for that particular slack setter - I've toyed with 3D printing a copy of that exact one because I thought it would be useful, or even something simple and more specific to the CT125 like this one. When I was running the OEM chain I was having to check it pretty frequently because my riding profile is hard on clutches, chains and brake pads, so having something that makes that job easy seemed like a really good idea. Still does actually. Thanks for reminding me to make a tool :).
 

bryanchurch06

Active member
Joined
Nov 4, 2022
Messages
230
Multiple toolboxes beats one big, heavy toolbox any day! I have a milk crate sitting in my closet with a toolbag, a drill kit, and several silicone trays for regular stuff inside the house, followed by 2 other toolkits outside that house my motorcycle tools and less commonly used tools.

I started a tradition of using my bonus to buy a "trinket" thing that I thought I might like. I've been constantly surprised at how many have since made it into my regular rotation and I would be sad if I had to do things without it (most recently a label printer, and a set of measuring spoons). I think if you use it a lot and like it, it's not a silly purchase.

As for that particular slack setter - I've toyed with 3D printing a copy of that exact one because I thought it would be useful, or even something simple and more specific to the CT125 like this one. When I was running the OEM chain I was having to check it pretty frequently because my riding profile is hard on clutches, chains and brake pads, so having something that makes that job easy seemed like a really good idea. Still does actually. Thanks for reminding me to make a tool :).
I swear when I ordered it I was thinking of you and your magic wizard of oz printer 😀, you know a couple of them go no go blocks would be good for the trip, just saying. Btw I meant no disrespect by the wizard of oz remark my wife constantly reminds me I'm only funny to myself, every body else thinks I'm an ass
 

SneakyDingo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2021
Messages
830
I swear when I ordered it I was thinking of you and your magic wizard of oz printer 😀, you know a couple of them go no go blocks would be good for the trip, just saying. Btw I meant no disrespect by the wizard of oz remark my wife constantly reminds me I'm only funny to myself, every body else thinks I'm an ass
None taken! Actually that's a pretty big compliment. You'd fit right in with my coworkers, they regularly say stuff like that about me too and ask me to do things that require stuff like that.

The go-no go blocks is a great idea. I really do just need to sit down, get the tension in spec, and then do measurements.
 

Cubtestdummy

New member
Joined
Feb 5, 2023
Messages
16
Location
Ellan Vannin
I keep a number of different tool boxes all of which are hobby / area specific.
It's resulted in a few duplicates and my late wife used to mock me mercilessly about it, she also supported the habit as it resulted in her getting jobs done immediately.
My new partner doesn't fully understand yet but when it comes to her bike maintenance getting done I'm sure she will.
A new Super/Hunter Cub box is currently being assembled with a tappet adjustment spanner next to be acquired.
It's this or recreational pharmaceuticals, I figure the tool addiction is slightly healthier.
 
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