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#2425 doing maintenance, probably like an idiot

SneakyDingo

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Aug 6, 2021
Messages
1,545
Is the screen protector a flat film? Wondering if it's something that could just be cut from some protective stock material.
3m film protectant works on about everything. I’ve converted 3 mountain bike frames and forks, easy to apply wet and can cut it to any shape. Heart gun allows it to make the curves.
It's very, very similar to the sort of protective screen you get for mobile phones, but with a matte finish instead of a smooth (clear) one like I normally get and a little more flexible.

The install process was pretty straightforward. Clean it like you would a phone, then use sticky tape to remove any dust that is left behind, align it as best as you can and then place it down. Remove backing side 1, apply to face. Smooth air bubbles out from the middle to the edges. Hope you didn't miss any dust in the process. Once you're happy, removing backing side 2, and you're left with the installed insert.

Maybe @AZ7000' can pitch in here for how similar it is to 3M film protectant, but to me you could absolutely put a 3M protectant on the front instead. The biggest issue I can think of would be heat from sun exposure.
 
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dmonkey

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Jul 4, 2021
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🇺🇸
Thanks, that answers my question. Since it's not a hard plastic or glass protector, I may as well go with the ISC helicopter tape I have on hand instead of buying the pre-cut film one for it.
 

AZ7000'

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Jan 28, 2021
Messages
945
It is the same material as the clear bra's on car fronts. Heat and uv shouldn't be an issue. Tons of you tubes on the wet applications, its nice because you can cut any shape then peel the backing.

 

SneakyDingo

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Aug 6, 2021
Messages
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I just put 3M Clear on my light. Easy, no heat required, it’s pretty flat.
I did take it for a ride in the sun, and I found something I didn't like which might be my fault, might be... built into the product. Anti-glare means it has a diffuser film, which when dirty is pretty hard to read. And of course, I'd had my grubby mitts over it so it was hard to read in direct sunlight - but still easier than the Honda one.

So... I'm going to call it an overall win, but maybe I stash a small pack of paper towel under the seat of my bike 😂
 

SneakyDingo

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Aug 6, 2021
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Odometer: 1879 mi
Task: Install the shift support
Reference post: [Link]

Product link: Hard Racing Shift Support (heed the warning on the page for CT125s)

Tools:
  • 8mm socket
  • 10mm socket
  • 12mm 6 point socket
  • Socket extender
  • (probable) Sandpaper
  • (optional) Torque Wrench 12 Nm-27 Nm
Total time: 30m
Reference videos:
2021 CT125 Manual references:
  • 3-16 Step Bar
  • 3-13 Gearshift Pedal
OEM parts list links:


My first attempt to do this did not use a 6 point socket for the 12mm bolts. This resulted in rounding off the bolt head on the first attempt. I highly recommend using the 12mm 6 point socket for this job.

1. Using the 12mm 6 point socket, remove the 4 bolts holding the step bar. This was VERY tight on my bike.

2. Using the 10mm socket and the socket extender, remove the hex bolt securing the shift lever to the splined gearshift spindle.

3. With the shift lever off, remove two of the crank case cover bolts below the shift spindle using the 8mm socket and socket extender.

4. Install the shift support over the shift spindle. This may requires sandpapering the inner bearing sleeve. Do this by hand for the best result - wrapping a screwdriver with sandpaper did the trick. Took maybe 3-4 minutes with some 100 grit, stopping every 20-30s to see if it would slide over the lip. You want it to be as tight a fit as is possible while still being able to slide it over.

5. Install the two new crank case cover bolts along with the offsets. There are two metal offsets supplied with the shift support that go between the crank case cover and the shift support. Everything lined up nicely on mine. Have the 8mm socket and extension handy to finish screwing it in. Torque it to 12 Nm.

6. Reinstall the shift lever. It's a 10mm socket with the extension, but it's a 6mm flange bolt, so 12 Nm. The default position of the shift lever has the gap on the shift lever being directly vertical. If you rotated the shift lever you'll need to rotate it again at this step.

7. Reinstall the 4 bolts on the underside of the step assembly. These are 8mm flange bolts using a 12mm 6 point socket, torqued to 27 Nm.



Ride report Customer Satisfaction:
A little about me: I have nerve damage in my feet. If something is abnormal with my feet, I can tell something is wrong but I'm not really sure what it is (could be wet, could be cold, could be hot, could be I stepped in poop, all feels the same to me). However, I can tell what gear my Rohloff bicycle is in by the vibrations from the hub internal mechanisms. So while I can't feel much in my feet, I am very sensitive to the sensations I can actually feel.

I immediately noticed that the shifter was much stiffer than it was previously. It flexed before, and I definitely noticed it before particularly on the first shift out of neutral, and that flex is gone. I noticed it on the very first shift.

Is it worth it? I'm sensitive to these things, so absolutely yes for me. For the average rider, I'm not so sure. If you can feel the flex or know it's there, probably. It was a pretty easy thing to try, albeit an expensive one. If I had to make a recommendation, find a friend with one installed if you can and ride their bike for a bit.

20220816_221129817_iOS.jpg

20220816_235933328_iOS.jpg

#2425Maintenance
 
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SneakyDingo

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Aug 6, 2021
Messages
1,545
Odometer: 1984 mi
Owner's manual specification: Oil change, automatic clutch inspection. (pg 39-40 of the owner's manual)
Parts needed: replacement crush washer (Honda OEM part number 90407-259-000), Gold Plug MP-01 (optional)
Tools needed: 17mm socket, 17mm wrench (optional), oil funnel (optional?), nitrile gloves (both hands), paper towels.
Torque spec: 24 Nm for the oil plug.
How the bike felt: Shifting was good, but it was not great
How the bike felt after: Noticeably smoother shifting

Oil changes are a kind of special service for me on motorcycles. They're like getting a haircut - I know I feel better, I always see them as a bit of spoiling myself, and I tend to do them more frequently than others. And leading up to them things just kinda seem more gloomy, depressing, etc... just not as good as I know they could be. For motorcycles, it's less about hair poking me in the ear, bad hair days and whatnot, usually it's just that I miss shifts slightly more, and the shifting itself is a little less smooth than I know it can be.

Once again, the plan was to use Honda GN4, only this time I used the bigger 1 gal bottle and it was slightly harder to fill so I did actually need the oil funnel. Warm up ride, out came the plug, drained the oil and oil out was 661g, which is about 700 mL. Put 661g back in of clean oil, and the reading is slightly above the top mark on the dipstick - front wheel touching the ground, on the center stand.

The Gold Plug MP-01 gave a nice surprise too. It stuck itself to the skid plate as I used the wrench to remove it, making it easy to retrieve later. Post-change ride felt really good like it usually does. Nice smooth shifting, Plug muck was about what I was expecting.

20220826_184513315_iOS.jpg

Since I'm at 2000 mi, here's the fuel stats snapshot so far:
16.99 gal over 1920 mi, averaging 112 mpg, lowest of 92 mpg and highest of 125 mpg.
$81.15 in fuel thus far.

#2425Maintenance
 
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SLO

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Nov 26, 2021
Messages
375
Location
meadowview virginia
Left and right cover gaskets:
11395-K73-T60 GASKET, L. CRANKCASE COVER
11394-K73-T60 GASKET, R. CRANKCASE COVER

Oil spinner filter gasket:
15439-KWW-741 GASKET, OIL FILTER COVER

Rear brake lever split pin (you might replace this if you disconnect it to get the brake pedal out of the way to pull the right side crankcase cover off)
94201-20120 PIN, SPLIT, 2.0X12

RevZilla carries these, PartZilla also carries all of them but you may want to check with their support before ordering to get an ETA because they often have parts on backorder and don't make that clear when ordering

Also worth mentioning that Honda's maintenance schedule lists the first check of the Engine Oil Strainer Screen and Engine Oil Centrifugal Filter at 8,000 mi / 12,800 km so unless you've got uniquely dirty or foul circumstances, it's not necessary with the first oil change.
Thanks for part #s I tried to order over phone as well as look up on website. No luck. Ordered this morning thanks to your help.
 

SneakyDingo

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Tell me it doesn't require both to clean oil spinner.
You only need the right side. However that's the 8000 mi service so it's not needed for some time. I bought mine early because the gaskets were sold out for ages and I was placing another order.

You can watch the procedure here on the C125 Super Cub, the process is very similar on the CT125.

 

SLO

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Nov 26, 2021
Messages
375
Location
meadowview virginia
You only need the right side. However that's the 8000 mi service so it's not needed for some time. I bought mine early because the gaskets were sold out for ages and I was placing another order.

You can watch the procedure here on the C125 Super Cub, the process is very similar on the CT125.

I broke the center tab on the timing chain sprocket,and I do not know where it ended up. Maybe ground into little bits. Figured it might end up in oil spinner if I can't magnet or visual find it.I will do the procedure anyway. I put a strong magnetic drain plug in it right after I got it. Thanks again!
 

SneakyDingo

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Important disclaimer:
I did not need to do this. The weather is nice right now, the chain was in good condition, the sprockets were in good condition. I did this because I had time, the conditions were fortunate, and I was about to start working again so I was about to no longer have free time anymore. I wanted to learn this while I still had the flexibility of f**king up, waiting for parts to be shipped to me, then fixing it. I'd also never changed a motorcycle O-Ring chain myself, despite having changed and cut hundreds of bicycle chains.

There's no reason to swap your chain this early other than you want to do it.

I f**ked up, and had to take two swings at this so I'm glad I did this when I was actually able to get replacement parts.

Additionally, the Motion Pro Master Link Press Tool P/N 08-0675 did not work on the 428 chain as the tool was intended to be used. (Advertisers note: they never said that it would work, but the advertising material also indicated there was nothing stopping it from working either and that it should work) I'll be manufacturing my own version of this tool in the near future because I was able to get it work (not in the way they intended me to use it), and it was actually useful in the end, but it'd be way better if I could use it the way they think it should work.



Task: Swap out the chain and sprockets for the DID 428 VX X-link chain.
Time taken: 1h of actual work. Probably 10 minutes to replace the front sprocket and 10 minutes to replace the rear sprocket. Successfully installing the X-link chain took around 10 minutes, but a lot longer when I couldn't get the outer plate pressed in enough and eventually broke the master link. Most of the time was spent aligning the chain and getting the chain tension right, a step worth taking your time on.
Odometer: 2296 mi
CT125A manual specification:
3-14 Drive Sprocket Cover
2-33 Engine Unit (front sprocket)
3-26 & 3-27 Rear Wheel

Fiche references:
Important parts interacted with:
  • DID 428 VX Chain, +1 extra Master Link coz I f**ked up and forced on the clip for the previous one.
  • SPROCKET, DRIVE (14T) - P/N 23801-K2E-T00
    • OR JTF 273.13 13T.​
  • BOLT, HEX. (6X10) - P/N 92101-06010-0A
  • SPROCKET, FINAL DRIVEN (39T) - P/N 41200-K2E-T00 - see note under front sprocket replacement
How the bike felt: Good
How the bike felt after: Same, maybe better.

Tools:
  • (Suggested) a long piece of cardboard to lay on the ground
  • (Suggested) a sharpie
  • (Recommended) Straight edge ruler with mm gradations, 12" is best, gradations starting from the very end of the ruler is best. Calipers with a depth measurement capability will also work.
  • (NOT Recommended) Motion Pro Master Link Press Tool P/N 08-0675 - equivalent would be good, but something that actually fits the 428 chain.
  • Replacement 428 chain. Honda Manual states for stock configuration it is 108 links.
  • (Optional) Dremel tool with wheel to grind down or cut the head off the riveted pin.
  • Chain breaker - I used this one: HIFROM New Chain Breaker Cut Link Remove Tool Compatible with Motorcycle Bike ATV Heavy Duty Chains 415 420 428 520 525 530 630,Chain Breaker Link Splitter Tool - $15
  • Socket wrench
  • 19mm socket (rear axle nut)
  • 14mm socket (chain breaker)
  • 8mm socket (front sprocket cover)
  • 14mm wrench (rear axle bolt)
  • 12mm open ended wrench (chain adjustment)
  • 10mm open ended wrench (chain adjustment)
  • (optional) extra Master Link
For replacing the sprockets:
  • (optional) Motion Pro Chain Alignment Tool P/N 08-0048
  • Torque wrench (59 Nm max, 12 Nm min)
  • 14mm wrench (rear axle bolt)
  • 19mm socket (rear axle nut)
  • 8mm socket (front sprocket cover, rear sprocket nuts)
  • 10mm socket (front sprocket nuts) - thin wall sockets or something like the Motion Pro 08-0145 T-Handle Deep Socket Set
  • Blue loctite
Torque specs:
  • 6mm Hex bolt nominal torque: 12 Nm
  • 14/19mm Rear Axle: 59 Nm
  • Honda Nut attaching rear sprocket to hub: 32 Nm
Videos:


For only replacing the chain, there's two methods for this. The first is the same as the chain and countershaft sprocket - front cover comes off, expose the chain, then pull it through and manually feed it. The second is to use the old master link, pull the old chain through by connecting the master link to the new chain (without the clip) and making one super long, 216 link chain, then feeding it though. I used both, because I had to do two attempts at this.
  • For both methods, the recommended start point is to take a photo of the master link clip orientation so you know you installed it the correct way and lay out a long piece of cardboard or newspapers (the chain will be placed down on this). I taped two Amazon boxes together.
  • You also will want to pop off the front countersprocket cover. This requires a 8mm socket to undo two bolts.
  • Using the feed-with-master-link method on an uncut new chain means either counting the links, or marking it and feeding the new chain through twice - once to measure it, once to take it off to cut the chain (feeding the old chain back on), then once to actually install it. I feed it through twice. This is also useful if you are fitting new sprockets of a different size.

There are a lot of videos and every chain and chain tool is different. Sometimes you'll need to Dremel, sometimes you can just use the tool and pop out the link. Familiarize yourself with this step before proceeding.



I did this in the following order:
  1. Remove rear wheel and replace rear sprocket.
  2. Replace front sprocket.
  3. Reinstall wheel.
  4. Replace chain (easiest to use the rear sprocket to hold the chain)
  5. Align and adjust everything once everything was installed.


To remove the old chain:
1. Either pop the master link clip off, or press out a rivet using you preferred chain breaking technique.
2. Pull the old chain off. Do not throw it away yet.

To cut the new chain to the same length
3. Place the old chain on the piece of cardboard you've laid out ahead of time.
4. Place the new chain next to the old one. If it's worn the old chain will be a fair bit longer than the new one. Line up the start of the chain, and then line up the end of the chain link-for-link (so you have the same number of links). Place your chainbreaker near the end of the old chain with the shaft open far enough to slide the link in.
5. After double checking which pin to remove, use a sharpie to mark the pin that is being removed. You might need to clean the outer plate and rivet slightly of grease.
6. Take your chain breaker and pop out the marked rivet. I did not need to dremel mine using the tool I used.
7. Your old chain was likely longer than the new one. It will be a good idea to loosen the rear axle, and undo the locking nut on both sides of the swingarm adjusters so you can easily put the chain back on.

To install the new chain
8. Feed the chain through the sprockets, counter sprocket and rear sprocket.
9. Line up the links that you're going to pin together on the underside of the rear sprocket. Why there? Because it'll space them correctly and make it easier to put the master link on.
10. Feed the master link on so the open side is facing you. Follow the instructions on the packet - if it says use grease, use grease. If it says put some rings on first, put those on first. Etc.
11. Press the outer plate on. The outer plate should be far enough on that the master link clip can easily slide into the grooves, and does not need to be forced in.
Depending on the replacement chain, this step might be easy or difficult. The non-sealed DID 428 chains went on without any tools. The X-Link chain required a press. Something like the Master Link Press Tool can do the trick - a C-Clamp and a nut, two vise grips, etc. although they do tell you not to use vise grips, that's what most people seem to use.
12. Look at the photo you took before you started to check master link orientation - where the open end is and where the closed end is. Using pliers and one of the pins, slide the master link clip into the groove. This should not require much effort. If it's hard, the outer plate probably was not pressed in far enough, so press it in more and repeat. (note on the pliers: you can make your own master link pliers pretty easily for very cheap)

-- cont --
 
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SneakyDingo

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Aug 6, 2021
Messages
1,545
To install the front countershaft sprocket
1. 8mm sockets to pull off the cover - an upper and a lower bolt. On my bike this is a tight fit, but it will come off with some effort (the effort feels along the lines of "this will scuff the adjoining component" level of force).
2. Remove the two 6mm flange bolts (10mm socket) using a thin wall socket. If you use a regular fat wall socket, the countershaft will interfere and you'll run the risk of rounding off the nut. On mine the breaking torque needed was way higher than 12 Nm.
3. Turn the fixing plate slightly and slide it off the countershaft. once the grooves line up.
4. Slide the old countershaft sprocket off.
5. Probably a good idea to clean in there if you need to.
6. Reinstallation is in reverse. I also applied threadlocker like DaBinChe did.

Replacement bolt is BOLT, HEX. (6X10) - P/N 92101-06010-0A



To install the rear sprocket
1. Remove the axle nuts. 19mm socket and a 14mm wrench were my choices - holding the 14mm in place and loosening the 19mm.
2. Loosen the chain adjuster by using 10mm and 12mm wrenches to undo the locking nut (a lot) and carefully loosening the 12mm nut (at fixed increments, e.g. 6 turns on each swingarm side).
3. Remove the rear axle. If you can, support the rear wheel's weight slightly as you do this. Rotating the axle will help.
4. Gently lower the wheel out.
5. Undo the 4 nuts holding the sprocket on with an 8mm 6 point socket. They have orientation with a small cut-in on the outside of the nut that locks them firmly in place.
6. Remove the old sprocket and install the new one.
7. Tighten to 32 Nm.

Reinstalling the rear wheel:
  • Note that the collar and brake sub assembly need to align nicely into the grooves on the hub and the inside of the swingarm.
  • Note the chain adjuster has directionality via a prong on the underside.
  • Note that the brake pads may not easily slide over the brake rotor. Be patient and align everything well and it will fit without any special tools. Take a break if needed.
The order for reassembly is:

PositionPartPart number
1AXLE, FR. WHEEL (FOR RR.)44301-K01-900
2WASHER, RR. AXLE90501-K0G-900
3PLATE, SWINGARM SIDE90559-K0G-900
4Swingarm (is not removed)
5ADJUSTER, CHAIN (inside swingarm, has prong on underside)40543-K0G-900
6COLLAR, RR. WHEEL SIDE42304-K2E-T00
7Rear wheel
8BRACKET SUB-ASSY., RR. (Rear brake sub assembly)43190-K2E-T01
9COLLAR, R. RR. WHEEL SIDE42313-KTM-750
10Swingarm (is not removed)
11ADJUSTER, CHAIN (inside swingarm, has prong on underside)40543-K0G-900
12PLATE, SWINGARM SIDE90559-K0G-900
13WASHER, RR. AXLE90501-K0G-900
14NUT, U (12MM)90306-K0G-901



Chain adjustment and alignment
  1. Once the chain is on, adjust the tension. The rear axle nuts (14mm, 19mm) should be snug enough so there's no wobble, but loose enough to move for this adjustment.
  2. The spec is written on the swingarm but is 30mm of movement. The owner's manual on pg 67 has a good reference. Looser is better than tighter. Using both the 12mm and the 10mm wrenches at the same time, loosen the lock nut (10mm) on the end of the swingarms and adjust the 12mm nut until the chain tension is correct.
  3. Taking the straight edge ruler, measure along the top of the markings from the swingarm side plate (silver) to the end of the red swingarm where the chain adjuster end cap (silver) starts. On many bikes (but not all) the swingarm measurements are even when the chain line is correct. This is a good starting point for checking the alignment if you somehow managed to screw up the alignment. For other measurement tips see this thread. I use a straight edge against the side of the sprocket to give a good indication of whether it's aligned well.
  4. If it's not straight, adjust and check chain tension.
  5. Once the chain line is straight line up the ruler along the sprocket to visually verify the chain alignment is correct (or use Motion Pro Chain Alignment Tool, or equivalent, or wing it, everyone has an opinion here).
  6. Holding the 12mm nut in place, tighten the 10mm lock nut against it.
  7. Once the chain adjustment nuts are tight, tighten the rear axle nuts to 59 Nm.
  8. Verify everything is still good after tightening and nothing moved unexpectedly.

Final steps:
  1. Once everything is back together, press the brake lever a bunch of times to make sure everything is solid. On my bike the brake pads/pistons had been pushed out slightly when I reinserted the wheel, so the first time I went to brake I had no rear brake.
  2. Do a short test ride, where you can still limp home if needed. Just in case.
 
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SneakyDingo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2021
Messages
1,545
Odometer: Somewhere near ~3000 mi
Weather: Has started to drop to around 51F in the morning, 73F in the evening. Some rainy days but still mostly clear roads.
Life changes: I am now commuting to and from work 5x a week, a hilly 40 mi round trip. Eventually I'll get to WFH but right now I am stuck with commuting to the office every day.

Most people are more interested in the details of things that didn't go right rather than the things that go right, so I'll glass over the good stuff and point two things I've done since then. The biggest thing is that I'm now clocking up decent miles on the bike, no longer getting away with 1-2 weeks between fills.

The good stuff:
  • The last thing I did was the Glieder DID Chain 428 VX (X-Ring) chain. With all these miles, glad I did it. Would recommend. No loss in top speed. This is my favorite maintenance mod.
  • Hard Racing Shift Support. Still feels great. Would recommend.
  • USB install + Quadlock wireless charging kit and stabilization mount. This is expensive AF for the Quadlock for what you get but absolutely worth it. I originally started off with just the regular cable plug on the USB for the iPhone, but something goes wonky with charging and it thinks there's water in the port. This is entirely resolved with the wireless charging mount. 10/10 would recommend if you use your phone for nav. I would say... this is my favorite quality of life mod.
  • Suspension upgrade. Would recommend, but maybe not exactly this suspension. It works great, it was like the bike was made for it, but if you're riding off road I think it'll have some sadness.
  • The Diablo Seat continues to be my good friend. Each commute can extend beyond an hour despite being short because traffic navigation through this area is terrible. It's nice getting off the bike and having my ass not call me saying, "not tomorrow buddy." This is my favorite comfort mod.
  • Chimera fork caps for adding preload. Would recommend adding preload to the front forks. I think the Chimera bolts are massively overpriced. They look nice though.
  • Reversing the handlebar mount. Would recommend, love it. I did NOT rotate the bars as well, I only reversed the mount to be in the forward position. This shifted the bars forward enough that I could stand on the pegs without banging my legs into the bars. This doesn't sound like much, but then they started multiple roadworks in my area which involves riding over a 2-3" lip multiple times on each commute. I stand on the pegs, bounce the suspension and go over that at full speed because the motherf**kers behind me follow too closely because I do actually observe construction zone speed limits. Watching them slam into those asphalt lips at speed with an audible bang and seeing their vehicle lurch around with the combination of hitting a lip and slamming on the brakes while I glide over it nicely is one of the most satisfying parts of every day.
  • The Apache 4800 + Milwaukee Packout effort. Absolutely a great idea. I still use the crate most frequently, but I will definitely have to carry some equipment in inside of a padded case. The Apache 4800 is softer than I thought it would be on the inside; a keyboard scratched the shit out of the inside. Just cosmetics, but surprising that the keyboard plastic was harder than the case plastic. I modeled a new latch for the case that sits really nicely, uses magnets to hold it in position... that works great. Very happy with how this turned out, this is probably my second favorite mod with how often I use it. I occasionally get comments too which is nice. This is my second favorite quality of life mod, only getting knocked down one peg because I have two wishes with it: I want to install some screws in the middle of the plate to stiffen it up (right now it flexes a little), and with it being wider than the rear rack it makes getting through the gate I use daily slightly more difficult (could be resolved installing it sideways). Overall though? Loving it.
  • The OPMID swap continues to be one of my favorite mods.
No comment:
  • The SAE connector has yet to be needed.
The not so good stuff:
  • OPMID Screen protector has started to bubble underneath. Not gonna lie, totally expected this. This is absolutely because the cover of the speedometer expands and contracts, because it only happens on cold days. Would NOT recommend this specific protector because of this. I think cutting it out of 3M film and stretching it slightly on install would be way better. I've done that before, and had no issues for years. OR... hit it with compressed air to cool it down first, then install. Which is my plan for the replacement film.
20221009_154059404_iOS.jpg

Unknown:
Bought some cheap pogies / handlebar mitts off Amazon. They get two swings - one for the motorcycle, one for the bicycle. Will they work? Who knows. But they're cheap and worth trying. I don't have very high requirements here, it doesn't usually get THAT cold, but I did break my old winter gloves that I had when I first got the bike so it's time to start experimenting before I absolutely need to solve this. They flop down in a way that would likely be resolved by having a clutch lever to prop it up, so I'm going to try 3D printing something to prop it up slightly just for cosmetic reasons. Comes as 2x pair of mitts.

20221009_012522940_iOS.jpg

Tires still looking great. I have a SR241 (front) and SR244 (rear) sitting next to me.
 

SneakyDingo

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2021
Messages
1,545
November 2022 update

Odometer reading: 4152 mi
  • At 3900 mi I swapped the oil. I ran it out as close to the 4000 as I thought was reasonable, but the bike started asking me for an oil change closer to 1400 mi since the last change, with lots of high speed commuting involved.
  • I am noticing the chain, after being installed in mid September, is starting to indicate it needs its first adjustment. In terms of odometer readings, that's 1700 mi between adjustments with the DID 428 VX X-Link sealed chain.
  • In the stock form, the generic handlebar mitts are extremely useful but not great for this specific model.
    • There's two main problems - the cuffs absorb water, and the lining can snag on my gloved hand (fine without gloves). I think the latter can be solved by adding some stiffness or hand guards, but I don't know if there's enough space to do so.
    • I was using this cheap version to see if I would gain any real advantage from buying some handlebar mitts since my bicycle also doesn't have handlebar mitts and I've been curious about that too. The answer is absolutely yes.
    • I have seen that at the very least, there's some CT125's running around Japan with the Zeta Racing CW2's on them. I'll likely be purchasing some of those next time I make a Webike purchase.
    • Alternatively, I will also be considering MYO gear, since we have one of the best fabric stores in the NW located just around the corner from where I live.
    • Or both! Since I need some for my bicycle anyway.
  • The Packout mod has been extremely useful. I swap between the crate, nothing and the 4800 case all the time.
 
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dmonkey

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November 2011 update
I know the trail isn't that fast, but I never thought it was slow enough to travel back in time :p
Those Zeta Racing CW2s look like a nice setup. It does sound like having hand guards may be a requirement. "Easy to install over hand guard or hand protector without tools." so make sure you confirm that before ordering if you don't already have the Zeta (or other brand) hand guards. I'm a HUGE fan of mitts as a simple solution to extend the riding season. Paired with heated grips is even better.
I like that they have a large opening to easily slip your hands in and out without having to think about it too much. Though that's not as warm, it's always what I look for on motorcycle bar mitts instead of the lace up boxing glove style ones or ones with elastic cuffs. Worst issue I've had with my Hippo Hands was I had them adjusted in a poor spot and too loose so when I pulled my gloved hands out of them and bumped the left one it slid onto the horn switch and held the horn switch down. Then I had a crowd of people watching me having just parked my bike in a snowy parking lot, and the horn is going off without my hands on the grips. 🤦‍♂️On bicycles I use elastic cuff bar mitts, but it's a different level of risk there and something you train yourself to be conscious of same as toe cages, toe straps, and clip ins. And every once in a while you get it wrong and fall over in front of a crowd like a POTUS, shit happens.
 

SneakyDingo

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Ugh, I didn't noticed I missed a key 😂

With the Zeta Racing CW2's, I was going to get the L's no matter what, and they have a hand guard compatibility chart at the bottom. I think in the end the hand guards are really what's needed for my current setup too to keep them off the bars when I'm using gloves. The idea I had in mind was something close to wireframe Barkbusters, which... is very similar to a mostly-aesthetic hand guard.

I think I might take another shot at that this week to model something up that connects to the existing hardware based on the ARMOR HAND GUARDS Bend. I know exactly how to model that.
 

G19Tony

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Jan 24, 2021
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Las Vegas, NV
Ugh, I didn't noticed I missed a key 😂

With the Zeta Racing CW2's, I was going to get the L's no matter what, and they have a hand guard compatibility chart at the bottom. I think in the end the hand guards are really what's needed for my current setup too to keep them off the bars when I'm using gloves. The idea I had in mind was something close to wireframe Barkbusters, which... is very similar to a mostly-aesthetic hand guard.

I think I might take another shot at that this week to model something up that connects to the existing hardware based on the ARMOR HAND GUARDS Bend. I know exactly how to model that.

Take a look at the Barkbusters I put on 183. Twisted Throttle has them. I read through this whole thread. Well done!
 
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